If you’re anything like the way I was, you perhaps don’t pay much attention to your daily habits. Did you know that our life is the result of all our habits?

As Margaret Thatcher rightfully said:

“Watch your thoughts, for they will become actions. Watch your actions, for they’ll become… habits. Watch your habits for they will forge your character. Watch your character, for it will make your destiny.”

What we repeatedly do and think of every day, ultimately forms the person we are, the things we believe, and the personality we portray. Our Health, our Happiness, and our Success are all determined by our habits.

When I look back to about two years ago, the negative impact my poor habits had on my life at the time, is very apparent. I was very unenthusiastic and demotivated about everything.  I never looked forward to the day. I had little energy and always felt exhausted and lethargic. Most days I’ve been on edge and quite irritated. Aside from my day job, I never did anything productive or worthwhile. At that time, my life plateaued — I was no longer growing or improving myself. In a nutshell, I became stagnant and was wasting away my life one day at a time.

After taking a good look at my life from an unbiased perspective, it became crucial that something had to change. I wanted more for myself, so I made a conscious decision to change my life by changing my poor habits one at a time. I wrote new goals about what I wanted to be and achieve, and how I wanted to feel. I wanted to be kind, think positively, be healthy and fit, look my best, have happy, thriving relationships, and feel excited about my life and future. Based on these goals, I identified habits that I needed to change and started to practice them one at a time — it’s been some of the best decisions I’ve made for myself so far.

Here is a list of habits I changed that drastically improved my life:

  • Be more health conscious (i.e. eat less junk; eat more fruits & healthy foods)
  • Drink more water daily 
  • Exercise or Train at gym at least 3 days a week
  • Watch less TV
  • Spend less time on social media
  • Read and learn something new everyday
  • Journal
  • Meditate
  • Spend quality time with the people who matters most
  • Be more productive
  • Do what I genuinely love
  • Do a random act of kindness everyday
  • Stop procrastinating and just do it!

I learned that changing habits is a gradual commitment — a little each day goes a long way. I encourage you to look at yourself and your life with an open mind. If you are truly not satisfied with the way you live and feel, you alone have the power to make a change. Decide what you want for yourself. Set goals and create a life that makes you want to jump out of bed every day. 

What do you think?

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Thank you for reading.

Smile! Life is better when you’re laughing 🙂

Love, Candace

26 thoughts on “How Changing My Habits Completely Changed My Life”

  1. I love this post. I always felt like I wasted my 20s; it wasn’t until I turned 30 that I made the conscious decision to get the most out of every day. I started writing again, reading more, practicing yoga. Now I go to sleep feeling satisfied that I’m an active member of this universe. Sometimes it’s the smallest changes that can make the biggest difference!

    1. That’s awesome Nikki. I can totally relate. I’m turning 30 this year and I only now feel like I’m actually living — not just alive. Like you said.. it just takes that consciousness. 😊

  2. Those are some great habits babe. We are our habits, however we can develop any habit we so desire, therefore you can become whatever you want to be. Isn’t that awesome? Enjoyed rereading this, nice post babe!

  3. How wonderful to be so sure and focused when very young…Fortunately, I seem to have been a naturally happy person and just went with the flow. As I am quite ancient and lived through World War 11, I experienced joy when rationing ended (clothes & food) and freedom when peace was declared.Having been evacuated, I then appreciated being back with my parents and siblings. In a way I was given a free ‘life lesson…’ Today, it is obviously very different. There is too much media info for the young to truly absorb and make sense of. It’s a ‘me, me me ‘ world of instant gratification and greed..so sad to witness…Stress seems as common as a cold these days, so the saner/luckier, more laid back among us, must step forward to help the helpless! And that’s where you come in. The world needs a cool hand on its fevered brow, so good luck with your efforts.

    1. Hi Joy. I thoroughly enjoy your writing style. You have a very profound way with words.

      Thank you so much for sharing your wonderful story. I must admit, you are right about the younger (my) generation and it may be even more accurate for the future generations. I sense a lot of gratitude in the way you dealt with your life circumstances. I am sure it played/plays a major role in the happy person you are today — something a lot of young folks nowadays are lacking. Unfortunately, most of my generation seems like the ‘glass half empty’ type, which saddens me.

      I appreciate your encouraging words. Thank you.

  4. Reading this has been a great for affirming current changes I’m making in my life! I just recently started habit tracking for praying, visualization, affirmations, journaling, reading, exercising, and meditating but doing all of that at once out of the blue is a lot. Small daily changes is definitely something I’ll keep in mind. Thanks for your insight!

    1. Hey Mara, it definitely gets overwhelming when trying to do all at once. I’m still practicing one or two of them. But yes, a little each day will surely go a long way. Keep it up!

  5. Candace, thanks for stopping by my blog. I commend you for your recognition of your bad habits, but more importantly, your plan and action to change them. I read a book called “Habits,” by Charles Duhigg who notes what you prescribe. He said you must find the trigger for the bad habit and replace it with a good habit. You should also know that you are following the advice and wisdom of Aristotle who said “we are creatures of habit.” Well done and best wishes on keeping the good habits. Keith

    1. You’re welcome Keith and thank you for the well wishes. I really appreciate and value your insights — Aristotle and Charles Duhigg — I’ll look into the book. Have a good one and thanks for stopping by, I hope you stick around.

  6. First, I want to thank you for the follow. I’m still getting my feet wet and very much enjoying interacting with the greater blogging community.

    In maybe the last six months I’ve been pushed, kicking and screaming I must add, into treating myself more carefully. I have a job I love but I’ve had to make a clear split between work and the rest of life after it started creeping. The stress affected me physically and I had to slow down or I would’ve stopped altogether. This is a concise, specific post. For me at least, that is more helpful as a starting place than having an entire self-help book lobbed at me. Thank you!

    1. You are most welcome. I’m relatively new to the blogging community as well. It sure is nice interacting and learning from others.

      I’m so glad you’re taking care of yourself lately. Keep it up–the best project you’ll ever work on is YOU!

      I read a lot of self-help books and I share the salient points on my blog. Hopefully, it’ll come in handy for you and save you from having to read a whole lot yourself. Hahaha..

      Have a great day 🙂

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